Tag Archive | Wednesday Wings

Wednesday Wings: Merlin with Starling

Posted by Bob Lefebvre

Last month when I was out looking for Snowy Owls, I came across this Merlin feeding on a European Starling.

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Sunday Showcase: Mountain Bluebird Fallout

Posted by Dan Arndt

Since the snowstorm on Sunday, April 14, many Mountain Bluebirds have been reported in the city. These migrants were forced down by the weather. Over 100 were reported in Fish Creek Park, about two dozen at the Inglewood Bird Sanctuary, and about 40 in a yard in Maple Ridge. Rob English spotted these bluebirds feeding in the Mountain Ash trees near his home, and sent us these great photos.

male Mountain Bluebird

male Mountain Bluebird

female Mountain Bluebird

female Mountain Bluebird

male Mountain Bluebird

male Mountain Bluebird

Mountain Bluebird

male Mountain Bluebird

After hearing about the large flocks all around the city, and that the numbers were quickly dwindling at Inglewood Bird Sanctuary, I headed out on Tuesday evening with the Swarovski ATX 85, Pentax K-30, and digiscoping adapter, and spent a good hour watching and photographing a flock of six stragglers. While I had hoped that they would stick around so our Sunday group would get a chance to see them, I couldn’t take that chance, and boy am I glad I did!

You lookin' at me?

You lookin’ at me?

female Mountain Bluebird

female Mountain Bluebird

male Mountain Bluebird

male Mountain Bluebird

male Mountain Bluebirds

male Mountain Bluebirds

male Mountain Bluebird

male Mountain Bluebird

male Mountain Bluebird

male Mountain Bluebird

Wednesday Wings: The Down in Downy

Posted by Bob Lefebvre.

I have three Downy Woodpeckers that come to my feeders regularly.  They are not shy, and I managed to get some close-up photos that show the prominent nasal tufts of this species.  These help to keep wood chips (and nut chips) out of the bird’s nostrils.  It is sometimes said that Downy Woodpeckers are named for these downy feathers at the base of their bill.